WELCOME! Spacerox offers the finest quality meteorites from the Moon and Mars for sale. Spacerox is operated by Mickey Law, a zoologist with a passion for meteorites who has been studying space rocks since 1982. He has been a member of the Meteoritical Society since 1998 and is IMCA member #2164. PLEASE NOTE: You can click on the Moon or Mars images above for some historical background on these amazing planetary meteorites.
 


LUNAR  METEORITES


 
 

1cm scale cube
 
 

  

 
 
NORTHWEST AFRICA (NWA) 2977:  LUNAR GABBRO
Found 2005 Northwest Africa; Published 2006 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 90
 
NWA 2977 is an extremely rare lunar meteorite; it is actually a piece of rock from the Moon! It is not a breccia. When molten basalt cools very slowly, it forms a rock with unusually large mineral crystals called a gabbro. A gabbro has the same chemistry as molten or quickly cooled basalt, but its crystals are much larger. In this case, a basalt intrusion most likely cooled very slowly in a dyke or sill fissure within the Moon’s anorthosite crust. With just a simple magnifying glass, you can easily see hundreds of absolutely gorgeous crystals: yellowish green olivine, light gray high calcium pyroxene, and darker gray low calcium pyroxene. This piece of Moon rock is awesome! Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0201:  0.84gr partial slice; 15mm x 17mm x 1mm; $975
 
 

 

1cm scale cube
 
 

 

 
NORTHWEST AFRICA (NWA) 6355:  LUNAR FELDSPATHIC BRECCIA
Found 2010 Morocco; Published 2011 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 99
 
NWA 6355 is chemically indistinguishable from the regolith samples returned from the Apollo 16 landing site! In addition, data from lunar orbit chemical mapping of the Moon’s surface very strongly indicates this meteorite actually was ejected from some area on the bright highland peninsula between Mare Nubium and Mare Nectaris. This means that you could look up at the Moon and point to the area where this meteorite almost certainly originated! That would be quite an unusual experience with a lunar meteorite. With a magnifying glass, many dozens of anorthosite clasts are visible on both sides; and fusion crust is present along the bottom edge. Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0203:  0.76gr partial slice; 12mm x 17mm x 2mm; $615
 
 

 

1cm scale cube
 
 

 

 
NORTHWEST AFRICA (NWA) 2995:  LUNAR FELDSPATHIC BRECCIA
Found 2005 Algeria; Published 2006 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 90
 
NWA 2995 is a jaw-droping spectacular lunar meteorite! And it looks exactly like a lunar meteorite should look! In addition to the very obvious 7mm anorthosite clast, there are dozens of huge 1-2mm anorthosite clasts that are easily visible with the naked eye. With a simple magnifying glass, hundreds more smaller anorthosite and basalt clasts are seen in an ultra fine grained basalt matrix. Chemical mapping from lunar orbit suggests this may not be mare basalt. It is thought to instead be basalt magma that erupted through fissures in the outer rings of the far side South Pole-Aitken impact basin. This would definitely be the showpiece in any meteorite collection! Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0204:  0.85gr partial slice; 18mm x 26mm x 1mm; $1,575
 
 

 

1cm scale cube
 
 

 

 
NORTHWEST AFRICA (NWA) 8277:  LUNAR MINGLED BRECCIA
Found 2013 Northwest Africa; Published 2014 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 103
 
NWA 8277 is a fantastic naked eye example of either a mingled breccia or a regolith breccia. These breccias are formed near the lunar regolith surface; and their main characteristic is multiple breccias contained within another breccia. The large 5mm clast seen near the center shows two white plagioclase clasts and many greenish brown olivine clasts contained within a grayish brown pyroxene clast. To the left is a 4mm plagioclase clast with olivine clasts within it. To the right are two 1.5mm anorthosite clasts with pyroxene clasts within them. This is the perfect meteorite to demonstrate "breccias within a breccia" without the need of a microscope. Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0207:  2.13gr partial slice; 23mm x 24mm x 2mm; $1,095
 
 

 

1cm scale cube
 
 

 

 
NORTHWEST AFRICA (NWA) 482:  LUNAR IMPACT MELT BRECCIA
Found 2000 Algeria; Published 2001 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 85
 
NWA 482 is an extremely rare lunar meteorite because it contains only highland anorthosite crust minerals! It contains absolutely no detectable basalt minerals! Any black mineral grains seen are impact melted plagioclase. This mineralogy certainly indicates it is from the Moon's far side. NWA 482 also contains no regolith materials and was likely never near the lunar surface. It contains only deep anorthosite crust minerals that have been crushed together and remelted by countless impacts. Fusion crust is visible on the angled edge of this specimen. NWA 482 is an extremely rare lunar meteorite and it may actually be unique in containing only deep highland crust materials! Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0208:  0.38gr partial slice; 9mm x 14mm x 1.5mm; $975
 
 

 

1cm scale cube
 
 

 

 
NORTHWEST AFRICA (NWA) 8609:  LUNAR FELDSPATHIC BRECCIA
Found 2014 Northwest Africa; Published 2014 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 103
 
NWA 8609 is a terrific lunar highland meteorite to examine with only the naked eye. It shows more than a dozen 2-5mm anorthosite clasts and countless smaller clasts. There are also a few 3mm size pyroxene clasts and some melt glass to see. Many of the larger clasts are themselves breccias containing olivine clasts within them. The huge clasts plus very little melt glass indicate this meteorite is from deeper in the regolith and was not part of the top surface regolith. This is the ideal lunar meteorite to enjoy with just the naked eye, but you can use a magnifying glass to view this meteorite again and again; and each time you will see clasts and crystals you never noticed before! Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0211:  2.04gr partial slice; 17mm x 37mm x 2mm; $780
 
 

 

1cm scale cube
 
 
 

 
 

 
NORTHWEST AFRICA (NWA) 11273:  LUNAR FELDSPATHIC BRECCIA
Found 2017 Northwest Africa; Published 2017 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 106
 
NWA 11273 is a stunning lunar highland breccia! The numerous 1-3mm pure white plagioclase clasts stand out among the dozens of other large anorthosite, olivine, and pyroxene clasts. Many of these anorthosite clasts also contain olivine or pyroxene breccia clasts within them; and a few small broken bits of melt glass are visible. The large size clasts plus the near absence of melt glass indicates this meteorite's origin is from deeper in the lunar regolith and not from the surface regolith. There is 60-75% fusion crust remaining. This is a spectacular lunar meteorite to the naked eye, but you will be amazed at how much more exciting it is to explore with a simple magnifying glass! Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0212:  3.34gr end piece; 19mm x 29mm x 7mm; $790
 
 


MARTIAN  METEORITES


 
 

1cm scale cube
 
 

 
 

 
 
NORTHWEST AFRICA (NWA) 6963:  MARTIAN SHERGOTTITE
Found 2011 Morocco; Published 2012 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 100
 
NWA 6963 contains gigantic pyroxene crystals that are actually eight times the size by volume of typical Shergottite crystals! It also shows many large transparent quartz crystals. A typical Shergottite is thought to result from magma that erupted from a fissure in the Martian crust and then flowed onto the surface where it quickly cooled. But the huge crystals in this Shergottite suggests it remained within the fissure where it cooled more slowly and did not erupt onto the surface. The large shock melt glass bubble in this specimen would have preserved a sample of Mars atmosphere and then released that Martian atmosphere into the room when the saw blade cut this slice! Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0205:  4.03gr partial slice; 25mm x 24mm x 3mm; $1,455
 
 

 

1cm scale cube
 
 

 

 
ZAGAMI:  MARTIAN SHERGOTTITE
Fell 1962 Nigeria; Published 2000 as Official Meteorite in NHM Catalogue of Meteorites
 
Zagami is considered to be the typical Shergottite; and it was the first Martian meteorite available to collectors. Shergottites are thought to result from magma erupting from a fissure in the Martian crust and then moving in a shallow flow across the surface where it quickly cools. This typical slice shows how solidified pyroxene crystals are oriented in the somewhat general direction of flow. Tiny cracks in the rock are visible as plagioclase shock melt glass veins, as seen on the right side of this slice. Any cracks in contact with the Martian surface when the meteorite's ejection impact occurred will have Mars atmosphere preserved within shock melt glass vein bubbles! Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0206: 1.07gr partial slice; 11mm x 23mm x 1.5mm; $1,320
 
 

 

1cm scale cube
 
 

 

 
TISSINT:  MARTIAN SHERGOTTITE
Fell 2011 Morocco; Published 2012 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 100
 
Tissint is identical to the Shergottite EETA 79001, which is the meteorite containing Martian atmosphere in impact melt glass bubbles that proved all SNC meteorites are from Mars! Both of these Shergottites are also unusual in containing olivine in the form of giant megacryst clasts. Two of these 1.5mm broken olivine megacrysts are exposed on the top left of this specimen; and the typical Shergottite pattern of pyroxene crystals is seen over the entire surface. All of the visible plagioclase impact melt glass bubbles were broken open when this sample fragmented, but it is certainly possible there are intact melt glass bubbles in the interior that still preserve Mars atmosphere! Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0209:  1.71gr fragment; 10mm x 16mm x 10mm; $1,095
 
 

 

1cm scale cube
 
 

 

 
NORTHWEST AFRICA (NWA) 7397:  MARTIAN SHERGOTTITE
Found 2012 Morocco; Published 2013 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 102
 
NWA 7397 is chemically classified as a Shergottite, but looks completely different. There are none of the typical cigar shaped pyroxene crystals in a flow pattern. Instead, there are big 1-2mm rounded pyroxene crystals containing olivine crystals. There are also many large transparent quartz crystals present, as well as plagioclase shock melt glass veins. The large crystal size, presence of crystals within crystals, and melt glass veins strongly suggest this meteorite may have originated from a magma chamber near the Martian surface that experienced multiple periods of cooling and remelting. This end piece has 85-90% fusion crust, and can be safely handled for group viewing. Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0210:  2.72gr end piece; 18mm x 18mm x 5.5mm; $620
 
 


HOW  TO  ORDER  SPACE  ROCKS


 
Purchasing a meteorite from Spacerox is simple and secure because all transactions are made using PayPal. Be assured that Spacerox will never give or sell your address to anyone. You have our word on that. Please use the following email address for all correspondence:

 

 

TO ORDER: Send us an email with the catalog number, meteorite name, and your mailing address. We will reply with confirmation that the meteorite is still available and you will receive an email Invoice from PayPal requesting payment. Once payment has been verified by PayPal, your space rock will be on its way to you.

The prices shown in our catalog are in US Dollars and include Priority Mail shipping within the US. The buyer pays any additional costs for orders shipped outside the US. Full payment in US Dollars must be verified by PayPal before an order is shipped. Delivery liability for Spacerox ends when delivery is verified at the buyer's mailing address by the US Postal Service or other parcel carrier used by Spacerox.

Please understand that all sales are final. Spacerox does not sell meteorites on approval. It is your responsibility to be certain the meteorite you purchase is the meteorite you want. Spacerox guarantees the meteorite you receive will be exactly the meteorite shown and described in the above catalog. You are welcome to request additional photos or descriptive information before making a purchase, but Spacerox does not accept returns.